How To: Launch Oracle Form (FMB/ D2K) from OAF Page

Given below is the code snippet to invoke Oracle Forms from OAF page. However, it can get tricky when you need to pass parameters. Read the use cases further below for illustrations.

Launch Oracle Form from OAF

1. Add a button or link on the OAF page using form personalization. Note if the ID of the button/link.
2. Extend the controller of the page and override the processFormRequest method as follows:
public void processFormRequest(OAPageContext pageContext, OAWebBean webBean) { 
 super.processFormRequest(pageContext, webBean);

 if (pageContext.getParameter("Go") != null) { 
  // form:APPLICATION_SHORT_NAME:RESPONSIBILITY_KEY:DATA_GROUP_NAME:FORM_FUNCTION_NAME
  String destination =  "form:FND:APPLICATION_DEVELOPER:STANDARD:FND_FNDPOMPO"; 

  //Invoke the Form
  pageContext.forwardImmediatelyToForm(destination);               
 } 
}


Use Case#1: Launch Oracle PO Form from OAF to Create PO

Edit the destination string as follows to launch the PO Form:

String destination = "form:PO:PURCHASING_OPERATIONS_AIG:STANDARD:PO_POXPOEPO";


Use Case#2: Launch Oracle PO Form (with Parameters) from OAF to Edit PO

The parameters for a given form vary. The below-listed parameters are specific to a PO form. For other FMB forms, I would recommend to download the FMB and review it Oracle Forms Builder so that you can identify the parameters you need to pass.
 
  /**
    * Parameters: 
    * PO_HEADER_ID 
    * = poHeaderId => This is the document ID
    * 
    * ACCESS_LEVEL_CODE 
    *  = MODIFY => This indicates to open the form in edit mode
    *
    * POXPOEPO_CALLING_FORM 
    * = OAF => This is calling function name. 
    *    If your OAF page is registered as a function, 
    *    provide the function short name here
    *
    * G_QUERY_FIND 
    * = FALSE
    *
    */
 
    String destination = "form:PO:PURCHASING_OPERATIONS_AIG:STANDARD:PO_POXPOEPO:" 
       + "PO_HEADER_ID=\"" + poHeaderID 
       + "\" " + "ACCESS_LEVEL_CODE=\"MODIFY\" " 
       + "POXPOEPO_CALLING_FORM=\"OAF\" " 
       + "G_QUERY_FIND=\"FALSE\"";
 
    pageContext.forwardImmediatelyToForm(destination);



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GIT: How to create empty branch in GIT?

Execute the following command on the GIT terminal:

#Create Empty Branch
git checkout --orphan branch_name

#Clear Working Directory
git rm --cached -r .

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How To: Perform "Date Conversion" in ADF/ OAF/ JAVA

I run into the struggle of converting one data type to another all the time. And obviously, I don't recollect instantly how to convert one from another. So here's some notes for me & hopefully they will useful for you as well.

// 1. Get Date from Calendar 
 int year=2016; int month=1; int date=1;
 Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
 cal.set(year, month, date);
 java.util.Date utilDate = cal.getTime();

// 2. Convert java.util.Date to java.sql.Date
 java.util.Date utilDate = new java.util.Date();
 java.sql.Date sqlDate = new java.sql.Date(utilDate.getTime());

// 3. Convert java.sql.Date to oracle.jbo.domain.Date
 java.sql.Date sqlDate = new java.sql.Date();
 new jbo.domain.Date(sqlDate);
 /* To get current date & time in jbo.domain.Date */
 java.util.Date utilDate = new java.util.Date();
 java.sql.Date sqlDate = new java.sql.Date(utilDate.getTime());
 oracle.jbo.domain.Date jboDate = new oracle.jbo.domain.Date(sqlDate);

// 4. Convert java.util.Date to java.sql.Timestamp
 java.util.Date utilDate = new java.util.Date();
 java.sql.Timestamp timestamp_now = new java.sql.Timestamp(utilDate.getTime())

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OAF: CSS Classes for OA Components

Here is the link where all the OAF CSS classes for OA Components are published:
http://download.oracle.com/tech/blaf/specs/textstandards.html#general

 Do not go by the look and feel of this page. The CSS classes will reflect the look and feel of your EBS environment.

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How To: Redirect to a new page in OAF

The method pageContext.setForwardURL() is to redirect to a new page. There are several ways in which the method can be used in your controller class:

Option 1:

 //Create HashMap to include destination page parameters
 HashMap hm = new HashMap();
 hm.put("poNumber",poNumber);
 hm.put("pMode","createMemo");

 //Forward to destination page
 pageContext.setForwardURL(
  "OA.jsp?page=/xxcc/oracle/apps/ar/demo/webui/myDemoPG", // Path to the destination page
  null,  // No need to specify with KEEP_MENU_CONTEXT
  OAWebBeanConstants.KEEP_MENU_CONTEXT, // No change in the menu context. Keep same as source page 
  null,  // No need to specify with KEEP_MENU_CONTEXT
  hm,  // HashMap with page parameter
  true,  //Retain AM state.
  OAWebBeanConstants.ADD_BREAD_CRUMB_YES, //Show breadcrumbs
  OAWebBeanConstants.IGNORE_MESSAGES //Ignore any messages
 ); 

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How To: Remove all rows from view object (VO) in OAF & ADF

Option 1: 

The executeEmptyRowSet() method can be used to empty the VO. This is my preferred approach.
    /* Use the following snippet in the Application Module (AM) */
    OAViewObjectImpl vo = this.getMyDummyVO();
    vo.executeEmptyRowSet();

Option 2: 

Loop through the VO and remove each row. If the data set is too large this could be cost intensive. I do not prefer this option.
    /* Use the following snippet in the Application Module (AM) */
   OAViewObjectImpl vo = this.getMyDummyVO();
   while(vo.hasNext()){
      vo.next().remove();
   }

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OAF: How to find the OAF Developer's Guide

The OAF Developer's guide is the bible for OAF developers.

The document 131548.1 has the OAF developer guides for all Oracle EBS versions until date.

Happy coding!

Let me know if you need help with something!

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OAF: Create a new OA Workspace & Project

Follow these steps to create a new OA Workspace and Project:

Prerequisite:

  • Determine the version of the Oracle EBS environment. (Example: R12.2.4) 
  • Determine the JDeveloper version to be used for the corresponding EBS environment using Note 416708.1

1. Create OA workspace

  • Right click on Applications > Select New OA Workspace
  • Enter the Name of the Workspace (Example: Demo.jws) 
  • Select the Checkbox "Add New OA Project" 
  • Click Ok

2.  Create OA Project

  • On clicking ok, in the prior step the OA Project wizard should launch
  • Enter the Name of the Project (Example: myDemo.jpr)
  • Provide a default package if required (Example: com.myDemo)
  • Provide a design time DB Connection 
    • Select the checkbox Use Repository for Design Time
    • Select the DB Connection from DropDown OR Click New to create a new DB connection
  • Provide Run Time Configuration
    • ** This step is optional at this time but you will need to do this if you want to run your pages locally in JDeveloper **
    • Enter the following for each of the fields:
      • DBC File - This file can be obtained from the FND_TOP of the EBS environment.
      • Username - Enter the oracle apps username (Example: operations)
      • Password - Enter the oracle apps password (Example: welcome)
      • Responsibility Key - The responsibility key within which you want to run the page. (Example: APPLICATION_DEVELOPER)
      • Application - The application within which the responsibility is defined (Example: FND)


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SQL: Create a new user/schema in Oracle

Use the following script to create a new user/schema XDUMMY. Run these scripts as the SYS user:

/* Script to create new user with username XDUMMY and password xdummy */

CREATE USER XDUMMY IDENTIFIED BY xdummy
DEFAULT TABLESPACE "TEMP"
TEMPORARY TABLESPACE "TEMP"
QUOTA 20M on TEMP;

/* Script to grant session and create privileges to new user */

GRANT create session TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create table TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create view TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create any trigger TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create any procedure TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create sequence TO XDUMMY;
GRANT create synonym TO XDUMMY;

/* Create new objects in schema */

// Connect to DB as as xdummy/ xdummy
create table dummy_tbl (...);

/* Create synonym so that you can query from other schemas */

create public synonym dummy_tbl for xdummy.dummy_tbl;

/* Query your objects from another schema. Example: APPS*/

// Connect to DB as as apps/<apps_pwd>
select * from dummy_tbl;





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SOA: Fault Handling: Creating a fault policy

Fault handling is a very interesting concept in SOA. It is analogous to Exception Handling per OOPs concepts.

Fault Policy is defined to handle runtime fault exceptions. You can define actions to execute based on the type of exception. Here's a 1-0-1 on defining a simple fault policy:

1 -  Create the fault-policies.xml file

Right Click on the Project > Select From Gallery > Select SOA Tier/Faults > Fault Policy Document > Click Ok

This creates a fault-policies.xml within the project/SOA folder.

2 - Editing the fault policy

Open the fault-policies.xml to edit the fault policy.

Provide a unique ID to the fault policy:
<faultPolicy id="MyFaultPolicy">

Let's define the fault policy to retry 3 time at a interval for 120 sec for any runtime fault:

<faultName>
    <condition>
        <action ref="ora-retry"/>
    </condition>
</faultName>

This means for any fault (since no name is specified) the action "ora-retry" will be executed. The action "ora-retry" is a custom action here. We will need to define what ora-retry means.

3 - Define ora-retry

Add the following action to the fault policy file.

<Action id="ora-retry">
    <retry>
        <retryCount>2</retryCount>
        <retryInterval>60</retryInterval>
        <exponentialBackoff/>
        <retryFailureAction ref="default-terminate"/>
    </retry>
</Action>

4 - Review the Fault Policy

Here is how the fault-policies.xml document looks:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<faultPolicies xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy" xmlns:bpelx="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/extension" xmlns:medns="http://schemas.oracle.com/mediator/faults" xmlns:rjm="http://schemas.oracle.com/sca/rejectedmessages">
    <faultPolicy id="MyFaultPolicy">
        <Conditions>
            <faultName>
                    <action ref="ora-retry"/>
            </faultName>
        </Conditions>
        <Actions>
            <Action id="default-termination">
                <abort/>
            </Action>
            <Action id="ora-retry">
                <retry>
                    <retryCount>2</retryCount>
                    <!--<retryInterval>43200</retryInterval>-->
                    <retryInterval>60</retryInterval>
                    <exponentialBackoff/>
                    <retryFailureAction ref="custom-java-send-email"/>
                    <retrySuccessAction ref="default-termination"/>
                </retry>
            </Action>
        </Actions>
    </faultPolicy>
</faultPolicies>


5 - Create the Fault Bindings

Now the fault policy is created. However, the job is not done yet. We need to associate the fault policy to the composite. Thus, whenever there is a fault in the composite the fault policy "MyFaultPolicy" will be invoked.

To do this we need to create the fault-bindings.xml file within Project/SOA folder as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<faultPolicyBindings version="2.0.1" xmlns="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/faultpolicy">
    <composite faultPolicy="MyFaultPolicy" />
</faultPolicyBindings>




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How To: Throw a custom fault/ exception in BPEL (SOA-Fault Handling)

Fault Handling in SOA is analogous to Exception Handling in OOPs. Below is how to throw a fault in a BPEL process:

1 - Define the fault message type

Add the RuntimeFault.wsdl to the Project/SOA/WSDLs folder. This WSDL contains the message definition of the fault that will be thrown at runtime.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<definitions name="RuntimeFault" targetNamespace="http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/extension"
             xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/">
    <message name="RuntimeFaultMessage">
        <part name="code" type="xsd:string"/>
        <part name="summary" type="xsd:string"/>
        <part name="detail" type="xsd:string"/>
    </message>
</definitions>

2 - Define the fault variable to hold the fault

Define a new BPEL variable with the message type "RuntimeFaultMessage" created in the step above.

Variable Name: faultVar
Type: Message Type
Namespace: http://schemas.oracle.com/bpel/extension
Local Part: RuntimeFaultMessage

3 - Create a throw activity

Drag and Drop the "Throw" activity from the Components Menu into your BPEL process.

Activity Name: ThrowFault
Namespace: <Target Namespace of your BPEL process>
Local Part: <Name the Fault>
Fault Variable: faultVar (fault variable created in the step above)



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SOA: Basics: URLs for SOA Consoles - EM, OSB, B2B

If you are a beginner in middleware practice, keep these URLs handy for your reference!

Get the SOA Server Host Name & Port Number from your SOA Administrator.

Once you obtain that, below are the URLs you will use to access your middleware products:
  • SOA Console: https://host:port/console
  • SOA Enterprise Manager: https://host:port/em
  • OSB Console: https://host:port/sbconsole
  • B2B Console: https://host:port/b2bconsole


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Mobile: Everything it takes to get MAF 2.3 App running for an Android Device!

In extension to my prior post to get MAF 2.3 Apps running for iOS, here is what it takes to be Android -

Your target environment:

  • MAF 2.3
  • JDeveloper 12.2
  • JDK 1.8
  • Android API Level 23

Here is how you accomplish this -

1 - Download the android studio from here

2 - Once installed, launch the SDK manager and install all the API Level 23 packages

3 - Setup your simulator:
        a) Click Tools > Manage AVDs
        b) Click Device Definitions > Select Nexus 5 > Click Create
        d) AVD configuration:
            

4 - Locate your Android SDK (This is required to be configured in Jdeveloper)
     a) For Windows:
         Android SDK: C:\Users\xyz\AppData\Local\Android\sdk
         Android Platform Location: C:\Users\xyz\AppData\Local\Android\sdk\platforms\android-23
         Android Build Tools Location C:\Users\xyz\AppData\Local\Android\sdk\build-tools\23.0.3

5 - Create a keystore to sign the application
      keytool -genkey -v -keystore myKey.keystore -alias myKey -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -validity 10000


6 - Open JDeveloper > Tools > Preference > MAF > Android Platform
      Key in the locations determined in the step#4
      Key in the keystore location within the Release Tab and provide the passwords for both Debug and Release.

You are all set to deploy your apps on Android platform! Click here for my notes on iOS platform.



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Mobile: Everything it takes to get MAF 2.3 App running for an iOS Device!

All you MAF developers out there are certainly aware of the amount of ordeal one has to go through to get a MAF 2.3 App up and running. Here are the steps I followed, hope this helps make your life easier!

Your Target Development Environment:

  • MAC OS X EL Captain (10.11)
  • JDK 1.8
  • JDev 12.2
  • Xcode 7.2

Here are the steps to achieve this state -

1 - Upgrade your MAC to OS X EL Captain (10.11).
Please be aware this will take you forever to download. Took me 2 days!

2 - Upgrade your Xcode to 7.2
Please do not install Xcode 7.2.1 it is not compatible with MAF 2.3.

3 - Download the latest Apple Worldwide Developer Relations Certificate from here

4 - Create your apple developer certificate

      a) To create your certificate you will need a CSR File. Follow these steps to use Keychain to generate the CSR
          
           In the Applications folder on your Mac, open the Utilities folder and launch Keychain Access.
    Within the Keychain Access drop down menu, select Keychain Access > Certificate Assistant >            Request a Certificate from a Certificate Authority.
  • In the Certificate Information window, enter the following information:
    • In the User Email Address field, enter your email address.
    • In the Common Name field, create a name for your private key (e.g., John Doe Dev Key).
    • The CA Email Address field should be left empty.
    • In the "Request is" group, select the "Saved to disk" option.
  • Click Continue within Keychain Access to complete the CSR generating process.

      b) Login to the apple.developer.com > Click Certificates > Click Add
          Upload the CSR file you just generated. This will create a new certificate.

      c) Click Download once the certificate is generated 
           > Double click the .cer file to add it to Keychain on your Mac.

5 - Get the UDID for your iOS Device. Here is a link that will help: http://get.udid.io

6 - Register your device on developer.apple.com
      a) Log onto developer.apple.com
      b) Click Devices > All > Click Add
      c) Provide a Name for the Device and the UDID

7 - Register your app ID on developer.apple.com
      a) Log onto developer.apple.com
      b) Click Identifiers > App IDs > Click Add
      c) Provide the App ID, description and the services you want enabled on the App.

8 - Create a provisioning profile to enable distribution of your app.
      a) Log onto developer.apple.com
      b) Select Provisioning Profiles > Development
      c) Click Add > Select iOS Development & Adhoc Distribution
      d) Select your App ID > Click Next
      e) Select your developer certificate and devices you wish to deploy the app with.

9 - Download the provisioning profile. Double click it to install in Keychain.

10 - Open Jdeveloper > Preferences > iOS Platform > Provisioning Profile > Select your provisioning profile from the drop down list.

11 - Open Jdeveloper > Preferences > iOS Platform >Signing Entity is the common name on your certificate

You are all set to deploy your app on an iOS device! Click here for my notes for Android platform.

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ADF Skinning: Skin an ADF Pop-up

Mastering the art of ADF Skinning can help you change the look and feel of your application. Please view some of my prior blogs to get acquainted with the basics - How to create an ADF Skin, Applying custom class to ADF Faces

Today, we will discuss a specific use case. I have been asked the question – How to apply a border to an ADF popup? Let’s figure out how!

Skinning a PopUp

1. Create a custom skin MyDemo.css (Refer this post if you don’t know how to do this)

2. Identify the root component within the popUp. For this example, I am considering it to be an dialog box.

2. Add the following class to MyDemo.css
af|dialog.myClass 
 border: solid; 
 border-width: thick; 
 border-style: solid; 
 border-color: Red;
}

3. Apply the class to the popup component
<af:popup childCreation="deferred" autoCancel="disabled" id="p1">
      <af:dialog id="d2" styleClass="myClass">
              <af:outputText value="This is my dialog box" id="ot2"/>
       </af:dialog>
</af:popup>

4. Run the page. And here’s how the popUp should look



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Oracle B2B: How to unit test your Oracle B2B Setup

Oracle provides Shell and PL/SQL scripts to unit test your B2B application. These scripts enable you to enqueue/ dequeue messages B2B queues. Queing messages to the following B2B queues helps simulate inbound and outbound messages to/from Oracle B2B. Thus, enabling unit testing of your B2B Setup.

1) IP_IN_QUEUE - B2B queue for Inbound messages
2) IP_OUT_QUEUE - B2B queue for Outbound messages

Using Shell Scripts:
SOA 11g: B2B - How to Use Scripts to Enqueue a Message (Doc ID 1376541.1)
https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/SearchDocDisplay?_adf.ctrl-state=bu4l6uddl_185&_afrLoop=562365794673522

Using PL/SQL Scripts:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/b2b-tn-004-enqueue-dequeue-plsql-132991.pdf

Additional Reference:
Refer the Fusion Middleware User's Guide for Oracle B2B >> Chapter 23 Utilities for Enqueuing and Dequeuing
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E23943_01/user.1111/e10229/enq_deq.htm#XBBUG1502


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SOA: Basics: Creating a WSDL using a XSD

This is one of the basic requirements for SOA developers. Today, we will learn how to generate a WSDL file using a XSD. We will use Eclispe to achieve this. So, let's begin!

Our Objective:
To build a HelloWorld WSDL that will have the following inputs, outputs and operations:
  • Inputs:
    • First Name
    • Last Name
  • Outputs:
    • GreetingsMessage
  • Operations:
    • sayGreetings






















Creating the XSD

Create a new Dynamic Web Project > Provide a Project Name (HelloWorldSvc) > Click Finish
Right click the WEB-INF > Click New > Other > Select XML Schema File

Create HelloWorldRequest.xsd


Add the firstName and lastName elements to the HelloWorldRequest.xsd

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest" xmlns:tns="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest" elementFormDefault="qualified">
    <element name="hw_Request" type="tns:hw_Request" />
    <complexType name="hw_Request">
    <sequence>
    <element name="firstName" type="string" minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1"></element>
    <element name="lastName" type="string" minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1"></element>
    </sequence>
    </complexType>
</schema>


Similarly,
Create HelloWorldResponse.xsd


Add the following elements to the HelloWorldResponse.xsd

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse" xmlns:tns="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse" elementFormDefault="qualified">
    <element name="hw_Response" type="string" />
</schema>


Creating the WSDL

Right click the WEB-INF > Click New > Other > WSDL
Provide a name for the WSDL and click Finish

Follow these steps to update the WSDL:

Add the namespace for the request and response xsd to the wsdl

<wsdl:definitions xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
xmlns:tns="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/" xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" name="HelloWorld"
targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/" xmlns:request="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest"
xmlns:response="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse">

Import the schemas for the request and response

<wsdl:types>
<xsd:schema targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/">
<xsd:import namespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest" schemaLocation="../xsd/HelloWorldRequest.xsd" />
<xsd:import namespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse" schemaLocation="../xsd/HelloWorldResponse.xsd" />
</xsd:schema>
</wsdl:types>

Add the message for the request and response messages

<wsdl:message name="sayGreetingsRequest">
<wsdl:part element="request:hw_Request" name="parameters" />
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:message name="sayGreetingsResponse">
<wsdl:part element="response:hw_Response" name="parameters" />
</wsdl:message>

Update the process name and message binding
<wsdl:portType name="HelloWorld">
<wsdl:operation name="sayGreetings">
<wsdl:input message="tns:sayGreetingsRequest" />
<wsdl:output message="tns:sayGreetingsResponse" />
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:portType>


Generated Output/ Final WSDL

And your WSDL is ready! Here's how it looks!

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<wsdl:definitions xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/"
xmlns:tns="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/" xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" name="HelloWorld"
targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/" xmlns:request="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest"
xmlns:response="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse">
<wsdl:types>
<xsd:schema targetNamespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/">
<xsd:import namespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldRequest"
schemaLocation="../xsd/HelloWorldRequest.xsd"></xsd:import>
<xsd:import namespace="http://www.example.org/HelloWorldResponse"
schemaLocation="../xsd/HelloWorldResponse.xsd"></xsd:import>
</xsd:schema>
</wsdl:types>
<wsdl:message name="sayGreetingsRequest">
<wsdl:part element="request:hw_Request" name="parameters" />
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:message name="sayGreetingsResponse">
<wsdl:part element="response:hw_Response" name="parameters" />
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:portType name="HelloWorld">
<wsdl:operation name="sayGreetings">
<wsdl:input message="tns:sayGreetingsRequest" />
<wsdl:output message="tns:sayGreetingsResponse" />
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:portType>
<wsdl:binding name="HelloWorldSOAP" type="tns:HelloWorld">
<soap:binding style="document"
transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" />
<wsdl:operation name="sayGreetings">
<soap:operation soapAction="http://www.example.org/HelloWorld/sayGreetings" />
<wsdl:input>
<soap:body use="literal" />
</wsdl:input>
<wsdl:output>
<soap:body use="literal" />
</wsdl:output>
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:binding>
<wsdl:service name="HelloWorld">
<wsdl:port binding="tns:HelloWorldSOAP" name="HelloWorldSOAP">
<soap:address location="http://www.example.org/" />
</wsdl:port>
</wsdl:service>
</wsdl:definitions>



Hope you find this information useful.Please share your feedback below. I would love to hear from you.

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ADF: Skinning: Applying ALTA UI Skin to an ADF Application

Oracle’s new ALTA UI (introduced in 12c) provides a modern look to your ADF application. It is simple, clean and at the same time very sleek. Let me share with you how you applying the out of the box ALTA Skin to your application.
  • Note: You do not need to perform these steps when using the latest release of Oracle JDeveloper 12.2.1  as ALTA UI is extended by default when you create a new skin file.

Applying the ALTA Skin

Create a custom skin file MyDemoSkin.css within your ADF application. Refer to my prior post for the detail steps on how to do this.

Your trinidad-config.xml file looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252"?>
<trinidad-config xmlns="http://myfaces.apache.org/trinidad/config">
<skin-family>myDemoSkin</skin-family>
</trinidad-config>


Update the Trinidad-config.xml and add a version number for your skin-family. 

  • Best Practice - "Always version your skin families"

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252"?>
<trinidad-config xmlns="http://myfaces.apache.org/trinidad/config">
<skin-family>myDemoSkin</skin-family>
<skin-version>v1</skin-version>
</trinidad-config>


Your trinidad-skins.xml looks like this:


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252"?>
<skins xmlns="http://myfaces.apache.org/trinidad/skin">
<skin>
<id>myDemoSkin.desktop</id>
<family>myDemoSkin</family>
<extends>skyros-v1.desktop</extends>
<render-kit-id>org.apache.myfaces.trinidad.desktop</render-kit-id>
<style-sheet-name>skins/myDemoSkin/myDemoSkin.css</style-sheet-name>
<bundle-name>com.demo.view.skinBundle</bundle-name>
</skin>
</skins>

Notice that your skin (MyDemoSkin) extends the out of the box skyros skin (skyros-v1.desktop). We will update this to extend ALTA skin.


Update the trinidad-skins.xml to modify the <extends> property:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="windows-1252"?>
<skins xmlns="http://myfaces.apache.org/trinidad/skin">
<skin>
<id>myDemoSkin.desktop</id>
<family>myDemoSkin</family>
<!--extends>skyros-v1.desktop</extends-->
<extends>alta-v1.desktop</extends>
<render-kit-id>org.apache.myfaces.trinidad.desktop</render-kit-id>
<style-sheet-name>skins/myDemoSkin/myDemoSkin.css</style-sheet-name>
<bundle-name>com.demo.view.skinBundle</bundle-name>
</skin>
</skins>

Now your ADF UI will follow the ALTA look and feel. Furthermore, you can create custom classes within your MyDemoSkin.css and enhance the appearance of your UI.

Learn how to define custom style classes and apply them to ADF Faces components here.


Hope you find this information useful. Please share your feedback below. I would love to hear from you. 

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ADF: Skinning: Creating a custom skin for an ADF Application

Applying style to your ADF application can radically change its look and feel. Here’s the basics on how!

Creating a Skin File

Using the new component wizard à JSF/Facelets à ADF Skin

New Gallery > JSF Facelets > ADF Skin

Provide a file name and the skin family

Enter FileName for ADF Skin

Select the base skin custom skin (MyDemoSkin.css) will be based on

Inherit skyros in ADF Skin 

Add your custom classes to the MyDemoSkin.css file

Add custom class to ADF Skin


Understanding the Impact

An entry is made in the trinidad-skins.xml
  • You can define multiple skin files within the trinidad-skins.xml file
  • You can define multiple skin files within the skin family
Review ADF Skin

An entry is created the trinidad-config.xml file defining the skin family that is used by the application.
  • You can have multiple skin families defined within your application. The <skin-family> tag specifies the skin family that is currently being used by the application.
  • You can use EL expression to programmatically apply skin family programmatically  here:
    • <skin-family> #{mybean.value}</skin-family>

Review ADF Skin


Learn how to define custom style classes and apply them to ADF Faces components in my next post.


Hope you find this information useful. Please share your feedback below. I would love to hear from you.

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